Don’t Be Motivated

Why would a reasonable person attempt to do something incredibly difficult?

Why do our cultural heroes have lives that seem a ceaseless procession of self-inflicted hardship and struggle?

Strangest of all, why does pleasure easily gained make us feel hollow, whilst earned victories, no matter how small, make us feel that our souls are firmly rooted in the earth?

Because we can envision the future, and observe the present. Humans beings have the unique ability to consciously conceptualize our ideals. By our own free will, we can determine a goal and calibrate our present actions towards that goal. If that goal is not achieved, we experience frustration and despair.

Failure is the confrontation between our ideals and our actions.

Frustration, despair, and guilt are all facets of the same pain; that of perceiving that our framework for acting in the world is not adequate to meet our goals. Such a perception is difficult to accept and act upon, but doing so is the very essence of personal growth and progress.

Where in this model of human behavior is the need for “motivation”?

Hoping for motivation is putting the cart before the horse. The feeling of wanting to do difficult things is not cultivated out of thin air. That feeling is an inseparable consequence of selecting a difficult, concrete goal and moving towards that goal with an efficacious behavioral framework.

That is why failure is really no failure at all.

If you are failing, and adjusting behavior accordingly, you are necessarily getting closer to your desired outcome.

And not only are you moving closer, but you are actually accelerating.

But goal setting without proper behavior calibration is nothing more than fantasizing.

Action taking without close analysis of results is mindless labor.

Motivation in itself is just an emotional high. It doesn’t help you. It doesn’t bring you closer to what you want. It’s only a feeling.

What matters is how that emotion is applied in action, and from what stimulus the emotion arises.

Are you motivated because you are accelerating towards your goal?

Or because to not be motivated would be to spiral downwards into a depression?

These are difficult questions. How could they not be?

Easy questions are not questions at all, for if they are easy one already knows the answer.

Easily achieved goals are not really goals but whims, shared by drug addicts and toddlers alike.

So expect difficulty. Expect failure. Relish in self-examination. Take pleasure in adversity, and above all, hold onto your ideal.

Because without a clear ideal to move towards, your life will lack more than motivation.

Meaning itself will whither and fade.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why Positive Thinking Matters

Why do we remember things?

In order to learn from previous mistakes, and correct present and future behavior.

Why can we project the future?

So we can foresee unfavorable outcomes, and avoid them.

The present is the only thing we can act upon. Both the past and the future exist only as images within our minds. From these images, we create our conception of the present.

Memories and predictions are the present moment’s context.

We have limited control over what we choose to remember. The unconscious mind filters perceptions for us and files them away. But in spite of that automatic process, we have near complete control over our attitude towards those memories.

Was that person cruel to us because of our inherently flawed personality, or because they themselves are inherently flawed, and are struggling to conduct themselves in the world?

Did our parent’s treatment of us cause permanent, irreconcilable damage, or nurture an indomitable resilliance?

Those choices, in how we conceive of past events, are left up to our conscious minds. By crafting those conceptions, we form the present moment’s context. This context determines our actions. Our actions determine our future.

And people say positive thinking is naive.

Just as depression stems from negative conceptions of the past, leading to impotence in the present, anxiety stems from negative conceptions of the future. This results in a rigid immobility, like that of a frightened prey animal.

But here again, we have control.

The world is not 10% as dangerous as it was when our biological systems evolved. We have a capacity for fear that far eclipses reasonable need. How can we overcome this obsolete circuitry?

By practicing positive visualizations of the future. Drown out the ugly projections. Look at them and dismiss them, again and again. Deny them the air they need to live. It may take months. It may take years. But thoughts, like animals, fight for prominence within your conscious mind. Support the positive conceptions. Do not nurture the negative with attention.

This is the essence of positive thinking; a vigilant tending to our mental gardens.

Do not hesitate to poison the poisonous.

Those flowers and fruit trees you wish to see grow must be tended to constantly. Water them with attention. Let them grow until they take over everything, even those patches of weeds you thought permanent and hopeless.

Do this every moment of every day of your life.

And perhaps in several years, you will wake up and find yourself in a Redwood forest, so strong and tall that the weeds are denied all light, all rain. These negative conceptions will perish without you even having noticed them.

That is the character of a healthy mind.

That is the power of positive thinking.