Artificial Intelligence

Enjoy the present moment in human history, for it won’t last long at all.

The wheels of progress screech towards the next revolution, and despite the ravings of ideologues and their bleating flocks, that revolution shall not be of the spirit, the state, or the self-identity.

At least, not at first. The origin of the next era, the next demarcated age will be a technology, like the seed drill, the steamship, the internal combustion engine.

Or more accurately, like the invention of the self-directing machine used for mass production. Shuttle looms and cotton gins…among the first of this kind of historical impetus to explosive change.

Ours will be the machine mind, a general intelligence that is for a brief moment comparable to ours, but soon builds itself anew, again and again, each time smarter, each time faster. Will we still exist when it reached the upper limit of intelligence?

Will we still exist when it reaches the upper limit of intelligence?

Will it make us obsolete, and optimize only for itself, or some other trivial goal?

Will it preserve our most basic instincts, and craft creation stories in the absence of our living presence?

Will it be bound to earth at all?

Climate change, nuclear war, global epidemics seem red herrings in comparison with this centuries dawning of a new god. A god of logic, whose embryo we made, and whose progress we must delineate.

Philosophy’s first practical test is soon coming. Has everything from Socrates to Nietzche been leading up to this moment?

Perhaps the designing of such an entity is the measure of all that contemplation, all that ruminating over the foundations of a perfect model of being.

The Future of Ideas

A crude version of the steam engine existed in the first century AD. It was thought of as a novelty, a toy, an interesting spectacle. It was by no means utilized for pragmatic purposes or used to jump start a revolution in manufacturing and transport. In fact, it didn’t change the world at all.

We often think that good ideas and great works automatically gain popularity and prominence. We believe that good ideas win, and bad ideas lose. Perhaps on an extreme macro scale, this is true. But it took almost 2,000 years for steam power to transform the world, even though the basic principle was known in the first century.

Such a historical oddity forces us to consider something:

What if the revolutionary ideas of the future are already in existence?

Perhaps some obscure book collecting dust in a local library is the only one that really got things right. Or what if some new age author accidentally stumbled upon the true meaning of life?

What if an unknown and minor physicist has already discovered the principle that will allow for intergalactic travel in 1,000 years?

Such “what ifs” are fun to entertain, but how can they help us?

They help us to understand that our civilization is still young, and far from understanding the Universe, or optimizing our lives through technology.

And in the realms of psychology and philosophy, I doubt we’re even at the point of discovering a rudimentary steam engine. Our most profound ideas today will be looked back on as profoundly naive and misguided.

Keep your mind open. Read the obscure and strange. Be skeptical of the popular and widely accepted.

Because when you look back at history one clear pattern comes into view:

Everyone was wrong about everything, except for a few brilliant weirdos.